Tag Archives: Moby-Dick

Cherish the Quiet Spaces

Savoring the Moby-Dick Marathon

We are now just 51 weeks from the The 16th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon.  To the more than 1,000 participants who joined us in New Bedford for the 15th, and the hundreds more who  joined us through our  live stream programing, thank-you for making this year’s Marathon a resounding success.

For an insightful account of the 25 hour long journey go to the blog Killing the Buddha to read “The Lingering Loveliness of Long Things” by Meera Subramanian .  It begins…

Last Friday night, a man late in his years and a recent recipient of news about his body that no man wants to hear, leaned in close to me and asked me a question. The air was heavy with mortality, and its twin emotion, love. What his question was is irrelevant, but the answer, I realize as I sit down to write about a marathon public reading of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick last weekend, is not. My answer was about how I cherish the quiet spaces in life. Time without interruption. Time for deep conversations or a sensuous focus on a single subject. Time to get into the grit of life, and let it unfold. I am decidedly of the mind that that’s where all the good stuff happens. I also feel like these moments, in our hyper-communicative lives, are becoming extremely rare. We share more, with more people, but we stay on the surface of an unfathomable ocean.

Reading together aboard the Lagoda (photo by S. Russell/ Medium Studio)

2011 Moby Dick Marathon Reading Timetable

2011 Moby Dick Marathon Reading Timetable

Approximate Time and Chapter in book for each Watch

Watch Time Chapter
Start   1 12:00PM 1
1:00 4(-4pages)
2:00 9
3:00 14
4:00 17(+2pages)
Start 2 4:00 17(+2pages)
5:00 23
6:00 30
7:00 35
8:00 40
Start 3 8:00 40
9:00 43(-2pages)
10:00 48(+2pages)
11:00 53(+3pages)
12:00AM 57
Start 5 12:00AM 57
1:00 64(+5pages)
2:00 72
3:00 78
4:00 83
Start 5 4:00 83
5:00 87(+10pages)
6:00 92
7:00 99(+2pages)
8:00 104
Start 6 8:00 104
9:00 110(+4pages)
10:00 119(+4pages)
11:00 128
12:00 134(-2pages)
1:00 Finis

Tweet the Marathon with #mdm15

Discovering Whales, Petroglyphs, and Moby-Dick on the Olympic Peninsula in June 2008

HERMAN MELVILLE PUBLIC LECTURE, JULY 30

(NEW BEDFORD, MA) – Robert K. Wallace will present “Discovering Whales, Petroglyphs, and Moby-Dick on the Olympic Peninsula in June 2008” on Friday, July 30 at 5:00 p.m. in the museum theater.

Free and open to the public, this illustrated talk will highlight some of the discoveries Robert Wallace made on the Makah Indian Reservation of the Olympic Peninsula during a two-week trip with landscape painter Kevin Muente.  Wallace will emphasize his encounters with gray whales, a humpback whale, and ancient Ozette petroglyphs in a sequence of events that brought Melville’s Moby-Dick to life before his very eyes.

Robert K. Wallace is a founder of the Melville Society Cultural Project at the New Bedford Whaling Museum.  He is author of Melville and Turner, Frank Stella’s Moby-Dick, and Douglass and Melville. He has taught Literature and the Arts at Northern Kentucky University since 1972.

For more information, contact:

Arthur Motta
Director, Marketing & Communications
(508) 997-0046, ext. 153
amotta@whalingmuseum.org

The 2010 Herman Melville Birthday Lecture, with Robert K. Wallace

The 2010 Herman Melville Birthday Lecture:

“Discovering Whales, Petroglyphs, and Moby-Dick on the Olympic Peninsula in June 2008”

New Bedford Whaling Museum Theater, Friday, July 30, 5 – 6 p. m.

Admission Free

By Robert K. Wallace

This illustrated talk will highlight some of the discoveries Robert Wallace made on the Makah Indian Reservation of the Olympic Peninsula during a two-week trip with landscape painter Kevin Muente. Wallace will emphasize his encounters with gray whales, a humpback whale, and ancient Ozette petroglyphs in a sequence of events that brought Melville’s Moby-Dick to life before his very eyes.

Robert K. Wallace is a founder of the Melville Society Cultural Project at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. He is author of Melville and Turner, Frank Stella’s Moby-Dick, and Douglass and Melville. He has taught Literature and the Arts at Northern Kentucky University since 1972 and is a past president of the Melville Society.

Emoji translation of Moby-dick

Kickstarter is a web-based fund-raising vehicle based on crowd-sourcing; the project below was posted there by Fred Benenson. As a result of 83 separate backers contributing $3,676 he will produce a never-before-released translation of Herman Melville’s classic Moby Dick in Japanese emoji icons.

Here’s an example of an Emoji sentence from Moby Dick:

Read more about Fred’s Emoji Dick Project at Kickstarter.

Inspiration through Moby-Dick Marathon

The Moby-Dick Marathon inspires action to support the Friends of the Hull Public Library.

Calliope Pina Parker is a sixth-grader who reads as many as 10 books a week and favors Harry Potter.  She is an avid user of libraries, borrowing from across the region. When budget cuts in Hull not only sheared the local library’s funding and hours, but also cost the town its state certification last month, Calliope took matters into her own hands.

Since January Calliope had been thinking about organizing a reading marathon. That was when her dad, Mark Parker, brought the family to see a friend participate in the New Bedford Whaling Museum’s annual reading of “Moby-Dick’’ – not yet one of Calliope’s favorites. But she appreciated the experience and thought about arranging her own reading marathon, which she did.  A March 6th readathon and bake sale was held, with wizardly cupcakes and “magic wand’’ frosted pretzel rods, raising awareness about the library’s circumstances and collecting money for the nonprofit Friends of the Hull Public Library.

Read the full story as posted by Eric Moskowitz at boston.com

“The Whale”, Philip Hoare

Thanks to guest blogger, whale enthusiast, and author Philip Hoare for submitting the following post and photographs. He has written numerous books, among them “Leviathan or, The Whale” (Harper Collins) , and the “The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea” (Ecco), just released.

The whale is perhaps the most mysterious animal known to man.  For centuries it inspired awe and fear, and was hunted for its oil, blubber and whalebone.  Now it is seen as a symbol of an ecological threat, a barometer for a world out of kilter.  It is even more remarkable that the transition from an age of whale-hunting to an era of whale-watching has happened within living memory.

Humpback off Tasman Peninsula, Tasmania

Ancient myth regarded the whale as an uncanny monster, a creature beyond comprehension.  A whale might swallow a single human being, such as Jonah, or an entire city, as one Greek myth imagined.  The poet William Blake wrote of a terrifying vision, ‘the head of Leviathan, his forehead was divided into streaks of green and purple like those on a tyger’s forehead…advancing towards us with all the fury of a spiritual existence’.

But ever since the early Basque fishermen travelled as far as the north-east coast of America to hunt whales, humans also saw these animals as a source of wealth.  When the Pilgrim Fathers sailed into Provincetown harbour in 1620, they saw  hundreds of whales ‘playing hard by us, of which in that place, if we had instruments and means to take them, we might have made a rich return’.  By the early 1800s, Provincetown was a profitable whaling port with a fleet of 70 ships, almost rivalling New Bedford – then the richest city in America, wealthy on whale oil – in what was, in effect, a New England version of a Texan oil boom.

Continue reading

Philip Hoare on NPR’s “OnPoint with Tom Ashbrook”

Author Philip Hoare is interviewed by on NPR’s “OnPoint with Tom Ashbrook”. He’s author of “The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea” and writer and presenter of the BBC documentary “The Hunt for Moby-Dick.”

Listen to the Tom Ashbrook interview Philip Hoare, callers to the program, and whale songs at wbur.org

New Bedford Cable Access in Partnership with the New Bedford Whaling Museum

Thanks to our friends at New Bedford Cable Access for producing this short public service announcement about the Moby-Dick Marathon.

Channel 17 is the NBCA  Educational Channel, and will from time to time be filming NBWM lectures and educational programs for broadcast.  We will share segments on the blog as they become available to us. Subscribe to the blog from the column on the right and keep up with educational programing at the New Bedford Whaling Museum.

“Fast Fish Loose Fish” by Ashley Theissen and Christian Hardy

Created in response to the opening of the exhibition “Moby Dick: Heart of the Sea” at the Rockford Art Museum in Rockford, Illinois on April 17, 2009 by Ashley Theissen and Christian Hardy.  Ashley began the film as a project in her 2009 Spring Semester class in Melville and the Arts at Northern Kentucky University, taught by Bob Wallace.  She and Christian expanded the film into its finished form so it could be exhibited as part of “Chasing Whales in Northern Kentucky: Local Artists Respond to Moby-Dick”, which ran from August through November 2009 at the Gallerie Zaum in Newport, Kentucky.