Tag Archives: North Atlantic Right Whale

A Small but Critical Victory for Right Whales

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Phoenix and calf. Sea to Shore Alliance photo.

Five years ago the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) enacted a seasonal ship strike rule to protect migrating, endangered North Atlantic right whales (NARW). This rule requires that vessels 65 feet (19.8m) or longer limit themselves to a maximum speed of 10 mph (16 kph) in designated zones (Seasonal Management Areas) during specified periods of time. For the Northeast, that meant January 1 – March 15 in Cape Cod Bay, March 1 – April 30 off Race Pt in Provincetown and April 1 – July 31 in the Great South Channel. The time frames for the mid-Atlantic and the Southeast reflect the months that NARWs are expected to be in those regions. This rule, proven to be effective so far, was important for the protection of this critically endangered species, the population of which is estimated at approximately 500 animals.

However, the rule had an end date attached to it, December 9, 2013. A year ago, the NBWM hosted colleagues from Whale and Dolphin Conservation, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, (Provincetown) Center for Coastal Studies, Humane Society of the U.S., Rhode Island Audubon and other members of the North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium to announce a campaign to convince NOAA to drop the end date (also known as a sunset clause) from this rule. We debuted the campaign video ‘Act Right Now Save a Species’, held a panel discussion, and made a petition available for signature by any citizen. In the past year, over 145,000 comments were sent to NOAA and 75,000+ people signed the petition.

Today NOAA announced that it has dropped the sunset clause from the Ship Strike Rule, thus making the rule permanent.  Collisions between whales and vessels are typically fatal. Two of the skeletons that hang in our Museum, the North Atlantic right whale with fetus, and the blue whale were killed by vessel strikes. By forcing vessels to slow down during those times when NARWs are expected to be in a given area, both whales and mariners have greater opportunity to steer clear of each other. This is a win-win situation and has proven to be much less of a burden on vessel operators than previously estimated.

The issue of entanglement has yet to be solved. But on a rainy day, NOAA’s decision is indeed a bright beam of excellent news for an endangered species and for the dozens of people who dedicate themselves to studying and protecting the North Atlantic right whale.

 

Brian Skerry, NatGeo Photographer, at NBWM on December 1

We have been working with colleagues at Whale and Dolphin Conservation and Audubon Society of Rhode Island to raise awareness about the survival issues facing the North Atlantic right whale.  Over the past year, the most timely issue has been the ‘Ship Strike Rule’ that was enacted in 2008 and given an end date of December 9, 2013. It would be up to supporters of this rule to petition the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to eliminate, or at minimum, push the sunset date back as more data was gathered regarding the effectiveness of this seasonal slow-down for ships longer than 65 feet.

We held a press event on December 9, 2012 to announce the Act Right Now campaign to continue the Ship Strike Rule in perpetuity. In that time, a campaign video was released, right whale curriculum was finalized and distributed to teachers in several states, a fun run was held in Plymouth, hundreds of letters were sent to NOAA stating support for the rule, and over 75,000 people signed the petition that was sent to NOAA headquarters.

As a means of highlighting the progress made in the past year and to bring further attention to this highly endangered species, the Whaling Museum will host a celebratory event on Sunday, December 1, beginning at noon. Headlining this event is renowned National Geographic photographer, Brian Skerry. Brian was born and raised in Massachusetts and his work is known around the world. He is the recent winner of the Underwater Category of the 2013 Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition! One of his photographs, of a Southern right whale, is featured prominently in our From Pursuit to Preservation exhibit. We are very happy to host him and this great event in three weeks.

 

Post_Card Brian_Skerry Dec1 Event

The schedule for the event is on the post card above. Please note that the tickets are being sold via our colleagues at Whale and Dolphin Conservation. But, if you do have questions, you can call NBWM Science Director, Robert Rocha, (508) 717-6849.

Protection for N.Atl. Right Whales May Become Permanent

Sixth months ago, on Saturday, December 9, the Whaling Museum hosted a press conference to announce the campaign to make the 2008 NOAA ‘Ship Strike Rule’ permanent. This rule was put in place for five years to test its effectiveness in protecting North Atlantic right whales in their habitat along the east coast of the United States. The rule dictates that during seasons in which NARWs are known to be in a given area at a certain time of the year ((e.g. in Cape Cod Bay from January 1 – May 15) ships greater than 65 feet must slow to 10 knots. The time periods for these slower speeds vary based on where the whales are expected to be during the year. This rule has proven to be very effective. No whales have been reported as having been struck in these Seasonal Management Areas since the rule went into effect. The cost to mariners is less than anticipated. The rule is having the desired effect.

Two days ago, on Wednesday, June 5, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration opened a 60-day comment period for the proposal to make Speed Restrictions to Protect North Atlantic Right Whales (50 CFR 224.10), colloquially known as the Ship Strike Rule, permanent. The New Bedford Whaling Museum, Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC), Rhode Island Audubon Society, Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, select faculty from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Right Whale team from the New England Aquarium and other members of the North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium (NARWC) all support making this rule permanent. It could certainly be made stronger by expanding the restriction to all vessels, not just those 65 feet or longer. But the simple elimination of the ‘sunset date’ of December 9, 2013 would be a testament to the effectiveness of this rule and a big step in expanding protections for a species whose population numbers somewhere around 500.

North Atlantic Right Whale female and calf. NOAA photo.

North Atlantic Right Whale female and calf. NOAA photo.

We invite you to learn more about the effectiveness of this rule by viewing the campaign video commissioned by WDC. This video features excellent footage of NARWs and the Museum’s right whale skeleton, Reyna – a whale killed by ship strike, and commentary from several members of the NARWC. Your comments to NOAA are welcome and encouraged.

Remembering Basque Whaling in North America

One of the most important North American archaeological sites related to whaling can be found in Red Bay, Labrador, in Canada. Red Bay was the largest and most important of several locations along the Labrador coast at which Basque whalers set up whaling stations to render the blubber from the whales they caught, beginning in the 1500s.  These whalers sailed across from the Bay of Biscay in their galleons to North America, to hunt baleen whales. The oil from these whales would then be sailed back to Europe for use as lamp fuel, soaps and other products. This phase of whaling under sail lasted until the early 1600s.

In recent years, the bones left behind by the Basque whalers have been examined by researchers, primarily Moira Brown and Brenna McLeod, to determine which species were hunted. It had been assumed that the targeted species were North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). The DNA extracted from these bones led to the identification of 21 distinct individuals, 20 of which were bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), the larger cousin of right whales.  The three species of right whale and the bowhead comprise the Balaenidae, one of the four families of baleen whales. This discovery has initiated some revisiting of the assumptions of the population numbers of North Atlantic right whales prior to the hunting that occurred between 1500-1935. Perhaps this species was never as populous as first imagined.

The Red Bay site has been nominated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. You can learn more about the site in this Global Travel Industry News article or Labrador Coastal Drive. For some first hand insight into some of the research done in 2004, search online for “Log of the Rosita – Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution”, written by former NBWM Trustee Dr. Michael Moore from WHOI.

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Bowhead whale skull at Ilisagvik College, Barrow, AK. Photo by Robert Rocha, NBWM.

Whale Watching Season Has Begun

Friend and colleague, Carol ‘Krill’ Carson, of New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance has posted a blog to Wicked Local with exciting news about yesterday’s whale watch in Massachusetts Bay.  The boat went out to the waters of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS), which has been listed as one of the 10 best whale watching sites on the planet.  Whether they leave from Provincetown, Barnstable, Plymouth, Boston or Gloucester, whale watch companies all motor out to the SBNMS.  Yesterday’s whale watchers got to see six different species of cetacean, including the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale (NARW).

Since regulations call for keeping a distance of 500 yards from the NARW, it’s a rarity to get such a close up look from a whale watch boat. WW boats must stay 100 yards away from all other marine mammal species. So, what all whale watchers hope for is that the whales and dolphins swim up to the boat, so they can all get a close look.

If you’re interested in seeing the NARW up close, you may be better served driving out to Plymouth or Provincetown to view them from the beach. Sometimes they come in quite close, much closer than 500 yards.  The  Face-ing Extinction: The North Atlantic Right Whale Facebook page is reporting that 68 North Atlantic right whales were seen in Cape Cod Bay yesterday. That’s the most ever for one day.

On a related note…

We thank NECWA, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, NOAA Northeast Regional Office, author/artist Peter Stone and the NBWM High School Apprentices for putting on a great Right Whale Day here at the Museum on Monday, April 15.  It was a great way for nearly 350 people to start their vacation week and learn about the right whale.

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Notable Year for Right Whale Births

Knowing that there are more North Atlantic Right Whale calves this year than last (20 vs. 6) makes for good news. What makes this really interesting is that two of the calves have made first time grandmothers out of two of the whales, made Wart a great-grandmother and put 1134 in the category of most prolific, with her 9th calf. The Savannah Morning News published an article yesterday about this year’s calves and about the sightings in the Southeast region during the winter months.

North Atlantic right whales are beginning to return to Massachusetts coastal waters for feeding and gathering in ‘surface active groups‘, otherwise known as SAGs.  Perhaps the best way to see these animals is from shore, especially a place like Race Point Beach in Provincetown. Whale watch boats must maintain a distance of 500 yards from these animals, as opposed to 100 yards for all other species typically seen on local whale watches. So, the whales are more likely to be closer to the shore than they are to a boat.

North Atlantic right whale breaching in Cape Cod Bay, May 2009.  Taken by Regina Asmutis-Silvia/WDCS

North Atlantic right whale breaching in Cape Cod Bay, May 2009. Taken by Regina Asmutis-Silvia/WDC

Your New Bedford Whaling Museum will celebrate this unusual, endangered species on Monday, April 15 with our fourth annual Right Whale Day. From 10:00am – 2:00pm, with the help of our friends at Whale and Dolphin Conservation, New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance, NOAA’s Office of Education, artist/author Peter Stone, and the Museum’s High School Apprentices, we will have a right whale obstacle course, multiple craft and activity tables, a 48-foot inflatable right whale (which you can into), a right whale drawing workshop, stories, lots of information and artifacts and cake. You can also sign the petition to extend past December 9 the rule that has done a very good job of protecting these whales from ship strikes.  All of these activities are FREE.

Act Right Now – Save a Species…The Video

North Atlantic right whale killed by ship strike. Photo by Monica Zani, New England Aquarium. Taken under NOAA/NMFS federal permit.

North Atlantic right whale killed by ship strike. Photo by Monica Zani, New England Aquarium. Taken under NOAA/NMFS federal permit.

On December 9 of last year, less than two months ago, the Whaling Museum hosted a press conference to announce the launching of the Act Right Now – Save a Species campaign. This campaign seeks to remove the ‘sunset’ date of December 9, 2013 that was included as part of the rule that requires ships greater than 65 feet to slow down to 10 knots when they enter areas known to be inhabited by the North Atlantic right whale. This rule is seasonal, since the NARW migrates along the eastern seaboard of the United States.  Based on the results of the first four years, this rule is proving to be an effective tool in cutting down on ship strikes in these areas.

It is critical that this rule be kept in place, if we are to minimize one of the human-induced causes of right whale mortality. Any population of animal that is as endangered as this one is (the population hovers around 500) needs our help for survival, especially if we know how to prevent these types of fatal interactions.

To that end, our colleagues at Whale and Dolphin Conservation commissioned a video to tell this story and to urge NOAA to remove the expiration date from this rule.  Several partners of the North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium, including WM staff participated in this important effort. We encourage you to watch this compelling eight minute video, which has both excellent footage of right whales and gruesome images of ship strikes,  and then sign the petition to extend the life of the 2008 Final Rule to Implement Speed Restrictions to Reduce the Threat of Ship Collisions with North Atlantic Right Whales.

The North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium consists of members from dozens of agencies, non-profits, universities and whale related businesses.  We proudly host their annual meeting each November.

Right Whales Arrive Very Early

The sighting of a North Atlantic right whale (NARW) in Cape Cod Bay, off the coast of Plymouth, MA is not unusual, except when the sighting happens between November and February.  But, when the whale is a female that hadn’t been seen for nearly three years, and she is accompanied by a calf, then the sighting is cause for celebration. This whale, nicknamed Wart, had been severely entangled in netting for two (probably excruciating) years before the third disentanglement attempt by the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies finally set her free in May of 2010. She hadn’t been seen since.

So, it was a very nice surprise when the adult was identified from North Atlantic Right Whale Catalog as ‘Wart’. This calf is her seventh, and her first since 2005. Typically, NARW females have a calving interval of 3-5 years.  This eight year stretch between calves may say a great deal about the physical stress that entanglement puts on the body of a right whale, especially a female. There’s a brief story and photo on CBS Local Boston.

The only known calving grown for the NARW is off the coast of southern Georgia and northern Florida. So far in this calving season, including Wart and her calf, there have been 14 mother-calf pairs spotted.

For photographs of both mom and calf, you can visit the Face-ing Extinction: The North Atlantic Right Whale page on Facebook.   These photos were taken by staff of Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC).  We encourage you to ‘Like’ the page. One of the goals for this page when it was set up by WDC, NBWM and Audubon Society of RI was to have as many people Like the page as there are NARWs. Presently the North Atlantic Right Whale Catalog, which is maintained by the New England Aquarium, lists 509 living whales. Now that we’ve reached that goal, it’s time to double it.

 

Act Right Now – Save a Species

The NBWM will host a press conference on Sunday, at noon, in our Cook Memorial Theater to bring attention to an important policy issue affecting the North Atlantic right whale. Please see the text of the media advisory below. The NBWM is happy to be part of this partnership to protect a critically endangered species of whale.

RW skimfeed From RA-SN. Atl. right whale feeding. Photo courtesy of Regina Asmutis-Silvia, WDC.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Karen Costa (WDC) karen.costa@whales.org

Cell phone: (617) 501-7892 (current & event day)

ACT RIGHT NOW – Save a Species: North Atlantic Right Whale

News Media are Invited to Cover

            

Who:    Whale and Dolphin Conservation, the New Bedford Whaling Museum, The Humane Society of the United States, and the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies

         

What:   Campaign launch, expert panel discussion, and video premier – Countdown to Extinction: One Year to Act to Save Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales.  The New Bedford Whaling Museum and Whale and Dolphin Conservation are hosting an open forum to discuss the plight of the North Atlantic right whale.  Join leading scientists and advocates in discussing the threats facing North Atlantic right whales. In addition to an expert panel discussion, curriculum guides for teachers will be available.

 

When:   Sunday December 9, 2012

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

 

Where:  New Bedford Whaling Museum, 18 Johnny Cake Hill, New Bedford, MA 02740

Why:     Leading right whale scientists and advocates come together to mark the one year countdown to the expiration of the Right Whale Ship Strike Reduction Rule and to ask the federal government to keep the rule in place, giving critically endangered North Atlantic right whales a chance to survive. The biggest threat to these animals was – and still is – man. Right whale populations were depleted to near extinction by whaling. With approximately 50 individuals remaining, the North Atlantic right whale is on the brink of extinction with vessel strikes, fishing gear entanglements and a lack of adequate habitat protection continuing to threaten their existence. Currently, seventy-two percent of their known mortality is attributed to human causes. Public support to keep the ten knot speed rule in place is needed.

Experts participating and available for interviews include:

Regina Asmutis-Silvia, Vessel Strike Program Lead & Executive Director, Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC)

Dr. Charles “Stormy” Mayo, Director of Right Whale Program, Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies (PCCS)

Dr. Michael Moore,Senior Research Specialist Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)

Robert Rocha, Science Director, New Bedford Whaling Museum (NBWM)

Sharon Young, Marine Issues Field Director, Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)

In 2008 the Right Whale Ship Strike Reduction Rule was enacted requiring vessels greater than 20m (65 feet) in length to slow to 10 knots in specific areas seasonally.  In an unprecedented measure, the National Marine Fisheries Service released the rule with a sunset date and the rule is set to expire on December 9th, 2013. This coming year WDC will lead the way with the Act Right Now campaign to gain public support for stronger and more permanent regulations to ensure that right whales have the best chance to survive the threats they face.  WDC, working in partnership with others, will work to extend and expand protections for North Atlantic right whales to prevent them from going extinct.  Find out what actions members of the public can take to ensure the survival of this fragile species at http://www.whales.org.

Celebrating the North Atlantic Right Whale

The New Bedford Whaling Museum examines the plight of the endangered North Atlantic Right Whale and also celebrates this magnificent animal in a free public program that features a movie excerpt and a talk by Peter C. Stone on AHA Night, October 11 at 6:00 p.m. in the Cook Memorial Theater.

 

The program begins with a 20-minute excerpt of the film, “Ocean Frontiers: The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship,” featuring historic collaborative efforts to protect right whales in Massachusetts Bay.

In 2009, armed with more than 25 years of scientific data, a coalition of industry, regulatory and research representatives moved the shipping lane in Boston Harbor. This decreased the chance of ship strike on whales by 81%.

This Green Fire Productions film includes video footage, interviews, and state-of-the-art graphics – highlighting the work of individuals who are helping us better understand the right whale and the need to minimize manmade negative impacts on its chances for survival.

Following the film, an illustrated talk by author, educator and artist, Peter C. Stone, explores the evolutionary wisdom and interconnectedness of endangered creatures in a presentation titled “Waltzes with Giants: The Twilight Journey of the North Atlantic Right Whale.” His new book of the same title will be available at no cost to attendees while supplies last. The artist will be available to sign copies of his book after the talk in the Jacobs Family Gallery.

Mystical and provocative, “Waltzes” is inspired by a real North Atlantic right whale and her increasingly perilous migrations from Atlantic Canada to her calving grounds off the coasts of Georgia and Florida. In the spirit of marine biologist and conservationist Rachel Carson’s sea trilogy, the story evokes the wonder, the sorrow, and the conflicts associated with this member of the suborder Mysticetes (baleen whales). Blending science and art with a literary voice, Stone takes us beneath the waves to reveal how we have historically decimated many species of whales and other fisheries for material gain, even though they are an integral part of the ecosystems upon which we depend.

Many of the North Atlantic right whales that have spent their summer in Canadian and northern New England waters migrate south through the Gulf of Maine and around Cape Cod, to follow the Atlantic coast towards the waters of Georgia and Florida. Others will explore outer regions of the North Atlantic, some venturing farther than others.  Most, if not all, will travel within 50 miles of the coast and all of the human-created hazards that such a trip entails. Nearly 75% of these animals bear scars of entanglement or ship strike.

The good news for this highly endangered species is that there are dedicated individuals paying attention to their movements. Dozens of researchers follow the whales using both simple and high-tech equipment, generating a clearer picture of their habits. In so doing we learn how to help these animals. Sometimes this means knowing how to avoid them. Artists and writers like Peter Stone also absorb the science and are inspired to create moving ways to communicate the challenges these creatures cannot overcome without wide-reaching human intervention.

Museum galleries are open on AHA at a discount – buy one admission, get one free.

The New Bedford Whaling Museum is the world’s most comprehensive museum devoted to the global story of whales, whaling and the cultural history of the region. The cornerstone of New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, the Museum is located at 18 Johnny Cake Hill in the heart of the city’s historic downtown. For events: www.whalingmuseum.org.