Colonial Chocolate Night is Feb. 13

Layout 1Colonial Chocolate Night, will be held on AHA, Thursday, February 13 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. The event features authentic colonial chocolate beverage recipes, products and free samplings. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The program is sponsored by American Heritage Chocolate® – part of the historic division of Mars, Incorporated – which manufactures chocolate products using authentic colonial recipes made only from ingredients available during the 18th century, such as cinnamon, nutmeg, chili pepper, orange and vanilla. Products will be available for sale.

Chocolate became a highly regarded addition to ship’s fare on whaling and merchant vessels according to “Chocolate: History Culture and Heritage,” a definitive 1000-page reference on chocolate’s development as a global trade. The book is available for sale.

River & Rail Symposium, Feb. 15-16

Wamsutta_Mills_c1900Noted historian, Kingston Heath will lead a weekend symposium on enterprise and industry in New Bedford titled The River and the Rail, February 15-16 at the New Bedford Whaling Museum.

The Port of New Bedford’s historical evolution as a manufacturing and commercial center provides valuable perspective on the growth challenges it faces today – managing ocean resources, cleaning up a century of pollution, and mapping a path forward for other maritime related industries while preserving its fishing industry. Join Kingston Heath and thirteen other speakers exploring and discussing the city’s principal natural resource and its role in the growth and renewal of a great American seaport.

The keynote speaker is noted historian and New Bedford native Kingston W. Heath, Ph.D., author of “The Patina of Place” – a study of the New Bedford architectural house style commonly called the “triple-decker” – how and why this iconic New England structure came to be, its links to immigration, industry, and urban landscapes. Continue reading

Correspondence of Captain Burr Sistare to his Wife, Abby

Included among several items donated to the Research Library in 2009 by Deborah, Hannah, and Christine Sistare are five letters written by a nineteenth century whaling captain to his wife back home. Captain Burr Sistare of New London, Connecticut, penned these letters from several different ports of call, including Faial, Cape Verde, and Talcahuano from the years 1845 to 1847. His rich correspondence reveals a deeply religious and devoted husband in command of a whaling voyage marred by an unfortunate twist of fate.

Consisting of five letters written to his wife, Abby, while in command of the ship General Scott’s 1845 voyage out of New London, Connecticut, Captain Sistare describes the typical events a captain expects to encounter while on board a whaling voyage, including desertions, illness, and theft. Sistare even describes the difficulties of catching whales during a particularly unprosperous season, describing his voyage as “broken” and states that “I have done all that land in my power to fill the ship.” Continue reading

Hidden Cartography Treasures Uncovered at the Research Library

Imagine walking the streets of New Bedford in 1834 or shipping aboard a whaler bound towards the Pacific Ocean on a five year journey. Whether it is through a diary littered with descriptions of nineteenth century New Bedford or a journal kept onboard a whaling voyage, the Research Library’s abundance of resources grant any researcher the ability to travel backwards in time and relive the past. However, lost among the robust collection of eighteenth and nineteenth century handwritten texts is another more visual component to the Library’s holdings.

In addition to the vast quantities of logbooks, manuscripts, and printed books, the Library proudly boasts a fine collection of cartography ranging from maps of the early Old Dartmouth region to navigational charts complete with multiple voyage tracks of nineteenth century whaling vessels. However, while other Library holdings are searchable through various databases and webpages, all details concerning the cartographic objects are not accessible online. As a result, the general public has never truly known the contents of this collection outside of the following text that appears on the Museum’s website:

“The cartographic collections number around 700 pieces including sea charts used by whaling masters, bound pilot charts and atlases, decorative maps, maps and charts of key geographical regions significant to whaling at different times in history as well as maps and charts of the local Old Dartmouth region.”

Fully aware of these circumstances and driven to remedy this situation, the Library has recently generated a complete finding aid for its entire cartography collection. A finding aid promotes access to Library materials by providing an overview of a specific collection and displaying a comprehensive inventory of its contents. The online nature and keyword searchable element of finding aids allow search engines like Google to catch the text, draw researchers to the Museum’s website, and most importantly, increase awareness of a previously inaccessible portion of the Library’s holdings.

Interestingly enough, the roots for this project date back almost a decade, when a group of select Library volunteers compiled all the necessary documentary information for each piece of cartography. Library staff sought to disseminate this information to the public through the Museum’s website, but waited until technology advanced and developed the appropriate means to accommodate these lofty goals. That day finally arrived this past September when Astrid Drew, an intern from the Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science, arrived at the Library’s door with the skill set needed to bring this project to fruition. Following a semester of diligent work, the finding aid debuted on the Museum’s website on December 3rd, 2013. The finished product serves as an impressive webpage documenting the entire cartography collection.

This project signifies more than the hard work of a single intern, for it serves as a working model demonstrating the Library’s anticipation in building towards the future and actively inserting itself into the ever-changing digital landscape. Although Astrid’s name appears as the author of the finding aid, this was a collective effort made possible through the vision of the Library staff and the time put forth by dedicated volunteers. Thanks to all their determination, researchers, map collectors, and even enthusiasts can finally experience the full magnitude of the Library’s cartographic collection in order to further their understanding on whaling, maritime culture, and Old Dartmouth’s past.

Visit http://www.whalingmuseum.org/explore/library/maps-charts to see the full finding aid for the Library’s cartographic collection.    

Moby-Dick Marathon celebrates education, Jan. 3-5

Herman Melville struggles with the opening line of Moby-Dick, as imagined by artist, Dave Blanchette

Herman Melville struggles with the opening line of Moby-Dick, as imagined by artist, Dave Blanchette

The 18th annual Moby-Dick Marathon January 3-5 celebrates education during a weekend of activities surrounding the non-stop reading of Herman Melville’s literary masterpiece at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. Pia Durkin, Superintendent of New Bedford Public Schools will lead the marathon on Saturday at noon. “We are pleased to welcome Superintendent Durkin as she reads from America’s most famous novel, written by one of its greatest authors. The museum stresses the importance of writing in our high school apprentice program; it is a life skill which is critical for success in every field of endeavor,” said James Russell, museum President and CEO.

Sponsored in part by Rockland Trust and Empire Loan Charitable Foundation, admission is free to marathon programs. Freewill donations supporting museum programs are gratefully accepted. Continue reading

Boston Tea Party ship model unveiled

In time for the 240th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, the New Bedford Whaling Museum is set to unveil a model of Dartmouth, first ship to be built in New Bedford in 1767, and which sailed into American history as one of the three vessels boarded and its cargo of British tea dumped into Boston Harbor on December 16, 1773.

Dartmouth, built in 1767 for the Rotch family, holds the distinction of being the first ship-rigged vessel constructed in then-named Bedford Village of Old Dartmouth, now New Bedford. Joseph Rotch arrived in the new settlement in 1765 from Nantucket, determined to establish a whaling industry on the mainland. He built Dartmouth to transport whale oil to England, then the principle market for his product. Carrying oil to England, the ship would return with British products for the colonies. It was with a cargo of tea that the ship returned to Boston in November 1773. The Sons of Liberty, determined not to pay the tax on tea imposed by the British, dumped the tea from Dartmouth along with that of the brig Beaver and ship Eleanor into Boston Harbor. This act of defiance, dubbed the Boston Tea Party, emboldened colonists to rebel against British rule. Dartmouth was lost in 1774 returning from her next voyage to London.

Despite its local origin and national fame, Dartmouth was not represented among the New Bedford Whaling Museum’s renowned collection of more than 175 ship models, due in part to limited historical data about the original vessel’s design and dimensions. To remedy the omission, the museum commissioned a model to be built by Richard Glanville, a professional marine model artist working in Maine. R. Michael Wall, proprietor of the American Marine Model Gallery, of Gloucester, Massachusetts, advised and coordinated the work, which first required considerable specific research to be conducted before construction of the 1/4″ = 1′ (1:48) Class-A scale model could begin, and which took Glanville over seven months to complete. Continue reading

A Small but Critical Victory for Right Whales

rightwhale_phoenix_calf_seatoshorealliance_permit15488

Phoenix and calf. Sea to Shore Alliance photo.

Five years ago the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) enacted a seasonal ship strike rule to protect migrating, endangered North Atlantic right whales (NARW). This rule requires that vessels 65 feet (19.8m) or longer limit themselves to a maximum speed of 10 mph (16 kph) in designated zones (Seasonal Management Areas) during specified periods of time. For the Northeast, that meant January 1 – March 15 in Cape Cod Bay, March 1 – April 30 off Race Pt in Provincetown and April 1 – July 31 in the Great South Channel. The time frames for the mid-Atlantic and the Southeast reflect the months that NARWs are expected to be in those regions. This rule, proven to be effective so far, was important for the protection of this critically endangered species, the population of which is estimated at approximately 500 animals.

However, the rule had an end date attached to it, December 9, 2013. A year ago, the NBWM hosted colleagues from Whale and Dolphin Conservation, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, (Provincetown) Center for Coastal Studies, Humane Society of the U.S., Rhode Island Audubon and other members of the North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium to announce a campaign to convince NOAA to drop the end date (also known as a sunset clause) from this rule. We debuted the campaign video ‘Act Right Now Save a Species’, held a panel discussion, and made a petition available for signature by any citizen. In the past year, over 145,000 comments were sent to NOAA and 75,000+ people signed the petition.

Today NOAA announced that it has dropped the sunset clause from the Ship Strike Rule, thus making the rule permanent.  Collisions between whales and vessels are typically fatal. Two of the skeletons that hang in our Museum, the North Atlantic right whale with fetus, and the blue whale were killed by vessel strikes. By forcing vessels to slow down during those times when NARWs are expected to be in a given area, both whales and mariners have greater opportunity to steer clear of each other. This is a win-win situation and has proven to be much less of a burden on vessel operators than previously estimated.

The issue of entanglement has yet to be solved. But on a rainy day, NOAA’s decision is indeed a bright beam of excellent news for an endangered species and for the dozens of people who dedicate themselves to studying and protecting the North Atlantic right whale.

 

BayCoast Bank grants $100K toward new Ed Ctr. & Research Library

BayCoast Bank has awarded $100,000 to the New Bedford Whaling Museum toward the building of its new Educational Center and Research Library planned for the southeast quadrant of the museum campus located along Union and North Water Streets. With groundbreaking planned for 2014, the new center will quadruple the museum’s classroom space and create a state-of-the-art Research Library.

In announcing the grant, co-chairs of the museum’s capital campaign, George B. Mock III and Donald S. Rice said “on behalf of the trustees and all those who have contributed thus far to this landmark project, we heartily thank BayCoast for its generosity and its vision in recognizing the long-term educational opportunities this facility will provide throughout the Whaling Museum’s second century of service.” Mr. Mock is president of Nye Lubricants and serves as first vice chair of the New Bedford Whaling Museum; Mr. Rice is the museum’s assistant treasurer

Nicholas Christ, BayCoast Bank president said “We take our commitment to the communities we serve very seriously and this project represents a strategic investment, one which promises to pay educational dividends to our students for decades to come.”

James Russell, museum president and CEO, noted “This extraordinary award from BayCoast Bank demonstrates its commitment to the community, and in particular, to our youth through its generous support of this unique educational facility. BayCoast leads by example and we hope this commitment motivates other leaders in the business community to join us in helping make educational excellence a primary goal across the region.”

To date donors have contributed 80% ($8.26 million) of the funds needed to meet the $10 million goal for the project, which is designed to increase K-12 through post-graduate educational programs and house the museum archives and collections amounting to 750,000 objects and items. It will create 4 new galleries and an extended observation deck overlooking New Bedford harbor.

A Quick Visit Back to Barrow, AK

welcome sign

Between 2002 and 2011, the Whaling Museum shared a U.S. Department of Education grant, known by its acronym of ECHO, with several partners, including the North Slope Borough in Barrow, AK. Our National Park Service office had also forged a relationship with the Inupiat Heritage Center in Barrow. In that time, several of us on the Museum staff, past and present, interacted with NSB and IHC staff at ECHO partner meetings as we planned our collaborative activities. Perhaps the two biggest benefits, personally, were learning the importance of truly listening to partners who have a completely different method of dealing with conflict resolution and experiencing first-hand a culture vastly different than the one we live in here in the lower 48. Early in my NBWM career, I spent four days in Barrow, meeting, interviewing, visiting and listening to the residents. I also gained a sense of the climate that Yankee whalers encountered between 1849 and 1915. It was a very eye-opening trip. I’m sure that my fellow WM employee, Michael Dyer, who spent a week at an Inupiat Immersion Course, would concur.

Unfortunately for these 5,000 people on the North Slope of Alaska, they are the first to feel the effects of a warming climate. The ice comes in later and leaves earlier. The late arrival of the ice makes it easier for the wind to create more wave action which speeds up coastal erosion. Permafrost may actually melt, which will shift the footings on which the houses are built, putting these structures in danger. Less ice also makes it easier for ships and oil exploration rigs to set up in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas.

This video from KTUU in Alaska gives a 5 minute glimpse into life in Barrow and a look into the Inupiat Heritage Center, featuring friend and colleague, Patuk Glenn.

Ms. Glenn is one of the many Inupiat we met during our ECHO meetings. I know that she has fond memories of her visit to New Bedford. I have fond memories of my visit to Barrow in 2004. Our cities were first connected by whaling. Now we’re connected by the sharing of educational resources and cultural information. May this connection continue for another 160 years.

Kenn Harper closes 2013 Old Dartmouth Lyceum series

(NEW BEDFORD, Mass.)  — Historian, linguist and writer, Kenn Harper will present an illustrated lecture titled  “Inuit and Whaling in the Bradford Era”, the final program of the 2013 Old Dartmouth Lyceum lecture series, on Thursday, November 14 at 7:00 p.m., Cook Memorial Theater, New Bedford Whaling Museum.

The Lyceum has focused on the many local connections to nineteenth century Arctic exploration with emphasis on the work of Fairhaven artist William Bradford as seen in the exhibit “Arctic Visions: Away then Floats the Ice-Island” in the museum’s Wattles Family Gallery. The exhibit runs through October 24, 2014.

Kenn Harper will examine how the whaling industry had a profound effect on the culture of Inuit in both Canada and Greenland and he will discuss this impact, its effect on Inuit life, and Inuit adaptation to the stresses and demands of change. He will recount epi­sodes from the lives of particular Inuit who used the whaling industry to their own advantage.

Harper has lived in the Arctic (both Greenland and Canada) for the past 47 years. He writes a weekly column under the name “Taissumani” for Nunatsiaq News, the newspaper of record for Nunavut, Canada, and is the author of “Give Me My Father’s Body: The Life of Minik, the New York Eskimo.”

The evening begins at 6:00 p.m. with a reception in the Jacobs Family Gallery followed by the lecture at 7:00 p.m. in the Cook Memorial Theater. Admission: $15 (non-members, $20). The Wattles Family Gallery will be open during the reception.

Sponsored by Nye Lubricants and Bruce and Karen Wilburn, the Old Dartmouth Lyceum is the region’s old­est public forum for “the advancement of popular education.”

Tweet hashtag: #ODLyceum2013