About

The Whaling Museum blog, initiated and administered by the NBWM Department of Digital Initiatives, seeks to record museum related news and engage our readers in discussions concerning common interests. The parameters are as wide as together we make them to be: collections, education, exhibits, programs, either from the museum or of interest to the community. Comments to postings are encouraged and we look forward to the ensuing dialogue. We ask that all comments remain respectful. The museum reserves the right to control all content appearing on this blog.

If you’d like to join our list of content originators please send notification to “photoresearch(at)whalingmuseum(dot)org”, along with your first posting.

The NBWM is located in New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA. The museum, through its collections and exhibitions, tells the story of the international whaling industry and the history more generally of the “Old Dartmouth” area, the Southcoast of Massachusetts. Its collection contains over 200,000 artifacts, including 3,000 pieces of scrimshaw and 2,500 logbooks (handwritten accounts of whaling voyages), both of which are the largest collections in the world.

The Museum also houses an extensive collection of fine art, including works by major American artists who lived or worked in the New Beford area, such as Albert Bierstadt, William Bradford, and Albert Pinkham Ryder, as well as significant collections of locally produced art, glass, furniture, and other decorative arts that flourished as a result of the wealth that whaling brought to New Bedford in the 19th century.

The Lagoda, the world’s largest whale ship model, is housed in the museum.

The content of this site, unless republished or otherwise credited is copyrighted by the New Bedford Whaling Museum/Old Dartmouth Historical Society.

17 responses to “About

  1. I’m so glad I found this site…Keep up the good work

  2. Excellent site, keep up the good work

  3. This blog rocks! I gotta say, that I read a lot of blogs on a daily basis and for the most part, people lack substance but, I just wanted to make a quick comment to say I’m glad I found your blog. Thanks,

    A definite great read…:)

    -Bill-Bartmann

  4. This blog rocks! I gotta say, that I read a lot of blogs on a daily basis and for the most part, people lack substance but, I just wanted to make a quick comment to say I’m glad I found your blog. Thanks,

    A definite great read…:)

    -Bill-Bartmann

  5. I don’t know If I said it already but …Hey good stuff…keep up the good work! :) I read a lot of blogs on a daily basis and for the most part, people lack substance but, I just wanted to make a quick comment to say I’m glad I found your blog. Thanks,)

    A definite great read..Tony Brown

  6. Hey, great blog…but I don’t understand how to add your site in my rss reader. Can you Help me, please :)

    • Aaron:
      I don’t think we have an RSS feed in our blog, would you like me to look into getting one? Would you like to receive email updates instead of RSS feed?
      Michael Lapides

  7. Thats very good to know… thanks

  8. Im sure many of you are like me and one of the first things you do in the morning is head here and check out the new post. Along with seeing the new posts, I’m also always checking out the blog roll rss feed and watching them grow, or shrink sometimes. In one of my past …but all in all excellent site. Keep it up!

  9. Hey, I really enjoy your blog. I have a blog too in a totally unrelated field (Online Stock Trading) but I like to check in here on a regular basis, just to see what’s going on and it’s always interesting to say the least. It’s always entertaining what people have to say.

  10. Really I liked this article!

  11. Thats very good to know… thanks

  12. This is a great way for the museum to reach out! Now I can be a fan on Facebook too. Keep up the great work!

  13. My family is selling some antiques; one of them is a scrimshaw tusk. I thought I’d mention it here, in case anyone is interested.

    It’s an elephant tusk with later scrimshaw of whaling ships, polychrome eagle and American flag. The inscription reads: Ship Masterson Following the Green Land Whale 1857. The length is 20.5 in.

    It’s being auctioned at Cowan’s in Cincinnati on Oct. 9. Here’s the link:
    http://www.cowanauctions.com/upcoming_dates_view_item.asp?ItemId=87827

    Thanks!

    Ellen

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